How Sustainable Is the FIFA 2018 World Cup?


How Sustainable Is the FIFA 2018 World Cup?

With the first England match of the FIFA 2018 world cup kicking off today we thought we’d take the time to look at whether this global event lines up with the global low-carbon transition.

Back in 2014, FIFA marketed the Brazil World Cup as the “greenest” event, citing the fact that Brazil has more solar energy than eleven of the competing nations combined. However fast forward four years and Russia look to have built on Brazil’s efforts, with greenhouse gas emission already set to be 550,000 tonnes lower than that of the 2014 tournament.

GOALS

The FIFA World Cup can and indeed should be viewed as an opportunity to promote a responsible attitude towards the environment and they have implemented these this year through the following objectives:

• Ensure the compliance of FWC stadiums with green-building standards

• Minimise the environmental impact of FWC-related transport

• Ensure efficient FWC-related energy and carbon management

CARBON OFFSET

FIFA has estimated that during preparation for this year’s tournament and throughout its duration 2.17m tonnes of greenhouse gas emission will be emitted, down from 2.72m tonnes as recorded in Brazil. To help meet their sustainability goals, they have committed to offset this by offering free carbon offsets to ticket holders for the first time as it strives to align itself with the Paris Agreement.

For each ticket holder signing up to the initiative on its website, FIFA says it will offset 2.9 tonnes of carbon dioxide, which is the estimated emissions of an average ticket holder travelling to Russia from abroad.

SUSTAINABLE STADIUMS

All the stadiums in Russia are expected to be certified as “International Bespoke Standard” by BREEAM by the time the event finishes, with five of the stadiums having gained interim certification as of January. The event will be the first where FIFA has pledged to ensure all venues comply with an internationally recognised green building standard, with built-in energy efficiency measures including metal-halide lamps, LED lighting with either darkness or motion detectors and rainwater harvesting systems at the stadiums in Saransk, Kaliningrad and Rostov-on-Don.

However, it has been pointed out that they have missed the vital opportunity to push the use of renewable technologies at this year’s event with not one stadium implementing a renewable infrastructure. If they had invested more into renewable systems such as solar pv and even energy storage they could have utilised the FREE electricity to help save money on their energy bills throughout the world cup.

It appears that FIFA has missed a global opportunity to use the 2018 World Cup this year as a global platform to champion sustainability however with the tournament just beginning we are looking forward to seeing if they implement the proposed sustainability goals!

With the first England match of the FIFA 2018 world cup kicking off today we thought we’d take the time to look at whether this global event lines up with the global low-carbon transition.

Back in 2014, FIFA marketed the Brazil World Cup as the “greenest” event, citing the fact that Brazil has more solar energy than eleven of the competing nations combined. However fast forward four years and Russia look to have built on Brazil’s efforts, with greenhouse gas emission already set to be 550,000 tonnes lower than that of the 2014 tournament.

GOALS

The FIFA World Cup can and indeed should be viewed as an opportunity to promote a responsible attitude towards the environment and they have implemented these this year through the following objectives:

• Ensure the compliance of FWC stadiums with green-building standards

• Minimise the environmental impact of FWC-related transport

• Ensure efficient FWC-related energy and carbon management

CARBON OFFSET

FIFA has estimated that during preparation for this year’s tournament and throughout its duration 2.17m tonnes of greenhouse gas emission will be emitted, down from 2.72m tonnes as recorded in Brazil. To help meet their sustainability goals, they have committed to offset this by offering free carbon offsets to ticket holders for the first time as it strives to align itself with the Paris Agreement.

For each ticket holder signing up to the initiative on its website, FIFA says it will offset 2.9 tonnes of carbon dioxide, which is the estimated emissions of an average ticket holder travelling to Russia from abroad.

SUSTAINABLE STADIUMS

All the stadiums in Russia are expected to be certified as “International Bespoke Standard” by BREEAM by the time the event finishes, with five of the stadiums having gained interim certification as of January. The event will be the first where FIFA has pledged to ensure all venues comply with an internationally recognised green building standard, with built-in energy efficiency measures including metal-halide lamps, LED lighting with either darkness or motion detectors and rainwater harvesting systems at the stadiums in Saransk, Kaliningrad and Rostov-on-Don.

However, it has been pointed out that they have missed the vital opportunity to push the use of renewable technologies at this year’s event with not one stadium implementing a renewable infrastructure. If they had invested more into renewable systems such as solar pv and even energy storage they could have utilised the FREE electricity to help save money on their energy bills throughout the world cup.

It appears that FIFA has missed a global opportunity to use the 2018 World Cup this year as a global platform to champion sustainability however with the tournament just beginning we are looking forward to seeing if they implement the proposed sustainability goals!

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