Sweden Will Reach its 2030 Renewable Energy Target by the End of 2018!


Sweden Will Reach its 2030 Renewable Energy Target by the End of 2018!

While most countries are struggling to reach their renewable energy targets, others are breezing past them. Thanks to both its geography and impactful policies, Sweden is set to achieve its 2030 goals in mere months.

In 2012, years before the Paris Agreement, Norway and Sweden signed a joint agreement to increase production of electricity from renewables by 28.4 terawatt hours within eight years. It only took a few years for Sweden to realize it was ahead of schedule and in 2017 it increased its target, aiming to add another 18 TWh by 2030.

Now there is a good chance it will reach the 2030 goal in mere months and maybe even by the end of the year.

Sweden consumes about 150 terawatt-hours of electricity per year, out of which around 16 were provided by wind energy. However, this is only the start of the road for Sweden who have already cross-party agreed to achieve 100% renewable energy production by 2040 and the figure is already hovering around 57%. The Country has also set a target of net zero emissions of greenhouse gases by 2045.

“I think meeting the target is entirely possible. We can see that with goals we set previously like the one for renewable energy levels by 2020, where we have already met the target. It actually tends to go quicker. Once you set the goal and start on the road, things tend to go very quickly. We’ll see. I wouldn’t be surprised if it’s sooner than 2045,” Climate Minister Isabella Lövin told The Local at the time.

However, it’s not like the rest of the European Union is doing particularly poorly. According to the Paris Agreement, all EU countries have agreed to achieve 20% final energy consumption from renewable sources by 2020. Most of the countries are well on target or have already achieved this but very few can compare to Sweden’s performance.

Of course, Sweden still has to find a way to manage this growth and ensure that the transition to a green grid carries on smoothly. It’s by no means an easy task, as neighbouring Denmark has recently learned but so far things are looking good.

While most countries are struggling to reach their renewable energy targets, others are breezing past them. Thanks to both its geography and impactful policies, Sweden is set to achieve its 2030 goals in mere months.

In 2012, years before the Paris Agreement, Norway and Sweden signed a joint agreement to increase production of electricity from renewables by 28.4 terawatt hours within eight years. It only took a few years for Sweden to realize it was ahead of schedule and in 2017 it increased its target, aiming to add another 18 TWh by 2030.

Now there is a good chance it will reach the 2030 goal in mere months and maybe even by the end of the year.

Sweden consumes about 150 terawatt-hours of electricity per year, out of which around 16 were provided by wind energy. However, this is only the start of the road for Sweden who have already cross-party agreed to achieve 100% renewable energy production by 2040 and the figure is already hovering around 57%. The Country has also set a target of net zero emissions of greenhouse gases by 2045.

“I think meeting the target is entirely possible. We can see that with goals we set previously like the one for renewable energy levels by 2020, where we have already met the target. It actually tends to go quicker. Once you set the goal and start on the road, things tend to go very quickly. We’ll see. I wouldn’t be surprised if it’s sooner than 2045,” Climate Minister Isabella Lövin told The Local at the time.

However, it’s not like the rest of the European Union is doing particularly poorly. According to the Paris Agreement, all EU countries have agreed to achieve 20% final energy consumption from renewable sources by 2020. Most of the countries are well on target or have already achieved this but very few can compare to Sweden’s performance.

Of course, Sweden still has to find a way to manage this growth and ensure that the transition to a green grid carries on smoothly. It’s by no means an easy task, as neighbouring Denmark has recently learned but so far things are looking good.

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